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Andrew Dickson - Acidic Oceans: Why should we care?
Date: 3/11/2009 The ocean absorbs almost half of the carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, changing its chemistry in ways that may have significant effects on marine ecosystems. Join Scripps marine chemist Andrew Dickson as he explains what we know --- and what we don't --- about this emerging problem. (UCTV #15754)
NBC Learn - Changing Planet: Ocean Acidification
As higher amounts of carbon dioxide become absorbed by the oceans, some marine organisms are finding it's a struggle to adjust. The Changing Planet series explores the impact that climate change is having on our planet, and is provided by the National Science Foundation (http://science360.gov/series/Changing+Planet/) & NBC Learn (http://www.nbclearn.com/changingplanet) For related lesson plans, visit the Windows to the Universe project team at the National Earth Science Teachers Association at http://www.windows2universe.org/earth/changing_planet/changing_planet.html
Introduction to CO2 Chemistry in Seawater, Part 1
Over the past twenty years, accurate measurement of the seawater carbon dioxide system has become a high priority for scientists who have worked to understand just how much of the carbon dioxide created by man's activities has ended up in the ocean, where it is distributed, and how it has changed the chemistry of the oceans; a process known as ocean acidification. Andrew G. Dickson, Professor of Marine Chemistry at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography UC San Diego, has been measuring carbon dioxide in seawater for over 30 years. In this two-part series, he introduces the basic chemical processes underlying the study of carbon dioxide in the oceans, and provides an overview of the experimental techniques that are in use to measure the levels of carbon dioxide in seawater indicating how a newcomer to this field might make decisions as to what research tools best suit them.
Introduction to CO2 Chemistry in Seawater, Part 2
Over the past twenty years, accurate measurement of the seawater carbon dioxide system has become a high priority for scientists who have worked to understand just how much of the carbon dioxide created by man's activities has ended up in the ocean, where it is distributed, and how it has changed the chemistry of the oceans; a process known as ocean acidification. Andrew G. Dickson, Professor of Marine Chemistry at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, has been measuring carbon dioxide in seawater for over 30 years. In this two-part series, he introduces the basic chemical processes underlying the study of carbon dioxide in the oceans, and provides an overview of the experimental techniques that are in use to measure the levels of carbon dioxide in seawater indicating how a newcomer to this field might make decisions as to what research tools best suit them.
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